Italian American Museum

As the name implies, the Italian American Museum in New York City preserves the history of Italians in the United States of America. This specialty museum sheds light on one of the largest ethnic groups in the nation. Visitors can expect to learn about the struggles of Italian immigrants as well as the tremendous success that subsequent generations achieved in various industries.

History

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The Italian American Museum occupies a historic commercial building that opened in approximately 1885. During its early years, the property was home to the Banca Stabile, which was a small bank that primarily served the growing population of Italian immigrants in NYC. The bank provided plenty of other essential services to the locals, including travel amenities and communication with loved ones. In 2001, New York's official state university network established a museum inside this charming building in the heart of Little Italy. Since then, the organisation has been strongly supported by the academics from universities and ordinary citizens who are proud of their Italian heritage. Professors from the City University of New York (CUNY) network have been particularly instrumental in the evolution of the museum. Throughout the years, the museum has acquired scores of personal possessions that once belonged to people who were part of the mass immigration waves from Sicily and other parts of southern Italy.

Exhibits and Galleries

As you'd expect, the Italian American Museum has a growing collection that's almost exclusively based on the experiences of Italians in the United States of America. Seasonal exhibits focus on the influx of immigration that penetrated NYC during the late 1800s. Authentic passports and other documentation tell the personal stories of the hopeful immigrants who crossed the Atlantic Ocean in hopes of a better life. Many of the items that are displayed at the Italian American Museum can be traced to the customs and immigration facilities at the famous Ellis Island. For decades, this small island in the New York harbour was without a doubt one of the busiest entry points for European arrivals into North America. The rotating presentations at the museum sometimes include photographs that highlight the daily lives of Italian immigrants in the tenements of Lower Manhattan. Some of the pictures clearly show shops, eateries and other businesses that occupy buildings which still stand in Little Italy. Other exhibits at the Italian American Museum focus on the success of Italian Americans in politics, sports, entertainment, academics and many other fields. NYC mayor Fiorello La Guardia, singer Frank Sinatra and baseball legend Joe DiMaggio are some of the most prominent individuals who fit into such stories of success in America.

Visiting Italian American Museum

The Italian American Museum is located in the heart of the historic Little Italy neighbourhood in Lower Manhattan. During the late 19th century and early 20th century, this densely packed district had one of the most significant populations of Italian immigrants in the United States. Overlooking the intersection of Grand Street and Mulberry Street, the museum offers a glimpse into one of the most vibrant ethnic communities in New York City. There are several New York City subway stations that are conveniently located just a few blocks from the museum. The 4 and 6 lines stop at the Canal Street and Spring Street stations. You can also take the B or D line to the Spring Street station if you're looking to quickly reach the Lower East Side district from most points in Manhattan. Additionally, several Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) buses stop along Centre Street, the Bowery and other busy roads that cut through the heart of Little Italy and the vicinity. Today, much of the once-booming Italian neighbourhood is overshadowed by Chinatown.

Location: 155 Mulberry Street, New York City, NY, 10013

Click here to visit Italian American Museum official website

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