The Diamond District | 47th Street NYC

by NYJ Team

New York City’s Diamond District is one of the world’s most unique shopping areas, concentrating thousands of independent jewelry and diamond businesses into one single area. Diamond District, situated on 47th Street, attracts thousands of visitors looking for that perfect stone, or simply those wishing to experience a shopping area of the kind not seen in many cities of the world.

Location
Diamond District is situated on 47th Street, between Fifth Avenue and the Avenue of the Americas (6th Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan. The district is run by a not-for-profit organization – the 47th Street Business Improvement District – that aims to enhance the economic development activities in the area. The organization is made up of merchants and landlords of 47th Street and has gone a long way to make this area safer, cleaner and more appealing to visitors. Some of the changes recently introduced include uniquely designed streetlights, an excellent sanitation program, and a strong relationship with the police force.

What to Buy in the Diamond District
For visitors looking for the perfect piece of jewelry, the Diamond District is definitely the place to be. From loose diamonds to those already set in jewelry, there is something for everyone in this area. In addition, visitors will find craftspeople who can set stones that are brought from home into unique pieces of jewelry for sale. In addition to diamonds, visitors can find practically any type of jewelry available in the district. From antiques to estate jewelry, from watches to pearls, from engraving services to pearl restringing, there is nothing connected to the world of diamonds and jewels that is not represented in the Diamond District.

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Jewelry Exchanges
While a small proportion of the merchants in the Diamond District have their own stores in the same way that you would expect to find stores in a mall or downtown, the majority of merchants operate from jewelry ‘exchanges’ that are dotted around the district. These jewelry exchanges – 25 in total – are a collection of independent merchants (up to 100 under a single exchange roof) who all deal with their own goods, allowing visitors to meander from stall to stall, examining the goods and getting the very best bargain to be had.

Facts
90% of the diamonds that enter the United States go through New York, and most of these find their way to the Diamond District in the city.

Over 2,600 merchants operate in the Diamond District, making this one of the most concentrated collections of jewelry businesses in the world.

Nearby Attractions
The Diamond District is located in a very central location in New York, making it a great excursion to combine with other sightseeing attractions in the city. The district is situated one block south of Rockefeller Center, three blocks south of Radio City Music Hall and one block east of Broadway. In addition, St. Patrick’s Cathedral can be found three blocks south of the Diamond District.

Visiting the Area
There is simply no other place like the Diamond District in Manhattan. This area offers the ultimate destination for visitors looking for diamonds and fine jewelry and has become an iconic tourist attraction over the years.

Location: situated on 47th Street, between Fifth Avenue and the Avenue of the Americas (6th Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan.
Mailing Address: 47th Street Business Improvement District, 580 5th Avenue, Suite 323, New York
Phone: 212-302-5739

Click to visit Diamond District official website.

South Street Seaport in New York City

by Denise Marie

South Street Seaport  is located what used to be known as the busiest port in America. It is one of the most popular historical neighborhoods in New York City that is known for some of the oldest buildings around, cobblestone streets, the maritime museum that was founded in 1967, shopping centers, restaurants and a view of the Brooklyn Bridge. Historical sailing vessels are docked at the pier where travelers and visitors can relive the marine pastime of the 18th century.

Seaport consists of around seven blocks of historical neighborhoods intersected by F.D.R Drive. For anyone visiting New York City South Street Seaport is a must see for anyone that is interested in maritime history, beautiful views and fine dining.

History of South Street Seaport
A city within a city is what South Street Seaport has become. Back in the 1850’s Seaport played one of the most important roles in the history of New York as the wealthiest commercial districts in the city. Steamships needed wider waters to navigate so the Hudson River then became the new port of New York for this reason.

After the US Civil War, Seaport fell into a declination when the Hudson River darkened East River with the large vessels. Restoration of the area began to take place around the 1960’s before the Seaport Museum was founded.

Redevelopment of the museum went underway in 1982 to turn it into one of the biggest tourist attractions with shopping areas, renovation of historical buildings and a newly structured Pier 17. The Howard Hughes Corporation now operates the Seaport.

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Attractions
One of the main attractions is the South Street Seaport Museum. Founded by Peter and Norma Stanford in 1967 the focus was to create a conservation of an educational site with exhibits of the historical environment during South Street Seaport’s heyday from 1820-1860.

For more than 27 years now Pier 17 has held many world class events and forms of entertainment for New Yorker’s and many visitors. The Pier 17 stage has been home to many holiday events, seasonal farmer’s markets and a community center for all.

Shopping malls, restaurants, concerts, cruises and other events take place all year round on the Seaport. There are many main attractions that can be found on the streets of the Seaport for the whole family to enjoy such as Titanic Park, Clipper City, Pier 15, the recreational pier, Imagination Playground and the Beekman Beer Garden.

Visiting South Street Seaport
While visiting South Street Seaport you will be in view of the 19th century ships that grace the harbor such as the Peking, Ambrose, Wavertree and the W.O Decker vessels. Within reach of New York’s financial district, you can reach Seaport by bus, subway or taxi from other locations in New York City.

Seaport is open all year round with the museum having seasonal hours. Pier 17 has many shops, restaurants and restored historical buildings that can be toured. Overlooking the boardwalk is a clear view of the Brooklyn Bridge and East River.

Hell’s Kitchen | Steeped in Infamy and Intrigue

by NYJ Team

Hell’s Kitchen is one of Manhattan’s anomalies. Nobody is completely sure where the name originated. Although there are several interesting versions of the story, there is one thing they all have in common: Hell’s Kitchen was not so named for its timid nature. Also known as Clinton and Midtown West, Hell’s Kitchen is steeped in infamy and intrigue. Covering the area between 34th Street and 57th Street from 8th Avenue to the Hudson River, this neighborhood of Manhattan has featured throughout New York City’s underworld history and was even the inspiration for the Broadway hit, West Side Story which features the feud between two Irish and Puerto Rican gangs.

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Due to its somewhat shady reputation, the real estate prices were much lower than the rest of Manhattan. Previously inhabited mainly by the poor and working-class Irish-Americans, the area has undergone massive reconstruction and is today home to many famous actors and entertainers due to its interesting history and proximity to all the major theaters.

Hell’s Kitchen is in close proximity to some of New York’s major attractions which include Central Park, Madison Square Garden, Broadway and Times Square. The borders have always been a contentious issue, much like the area’s history, but one thing is for certain: Hell’s Kitchen is a must-see during any visit to New York City.