Canal Street

Running through the heart of Lower Manhattan, Canal Street is a major thoroughfare that's lined with a mix of residential and commercial properties. This historic street cuts through Tribeca, SoHo, Chinatown and the Lower East Side. Easily accessible by the subway system, Canal Street is perfectly configured for sightseeing tours in one of the most vibrant parts of the City That Never Sleeps.

Attractions and Sightseeing

Canal Street
Running through multiple neighbourhoods in Lower Manhattan, Canal Street offers access to numerous cultural attractions. Located inside a former engine house that was built in the early 20th century, the New York City Fire Museum presents interesting exhibits on the history of the NYC Fire Department. This unique museum has firefighting equipment and other artefacts from the earliest days of the city. As the name suggests, the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art celebrates artwork relating to the LGBTQ community worldwide. This niche museum is located in a stretch of Canal Street that's known for having a vibrant gay population. Situated near the intersection of Canal Street and Lafayette Street, the Museum of Chinese in America tells the stories of Chinese immigrants in the United States. This museum is appropriately nested in the heart of Chinatown, one of the most populous ethnic enclaves in NYC. The street will also lead you to the Italian American Museum, which is located in Little Italy. This attraction is located in a historic bank that once catered to a large Italian population of Lower Manhattan. The eastern end of Canal Street guides you to the Eldridge Street Synagogue. Having a Moorish Revival facade, this synagogue opened in the late 1880s. Today, the property hosts a small Jewish congregation, and includes a museum with Judaica and other artefacts Canal Street defines a significant portion of Chinatown, which is home to plenty of small businesses that cater to recent immigrants from various parts of China. As you walk the busy thoroughfare, you'll notice lots of vendors who offer incredible bargains on clothing, shoes, accessories, souvenirs and scores of other items. The sidewalks are also lined with grocery stands that include exotic products, which are quite ordinary by traditional Chinese standards. Canal Street also defines the northern boundary of Tribeca, which is a chic neighbourhood that has a vibrant nightlife scene. Cosy cafes and intimate nightclubs are abundant in this upscale district that's heavily gentrified. Canal Street marks the southern tip of SoHo, which includes the Cast Iron Historic District. This neighbourhood has recently gained a great reputation in fine dining, high-end shopping and an active social scene.

Location and Transportation

Carrying vehicle traffic heading eastbound and westbound, Canal Street is one of the busiest thoroughfares in Lower Manhattan. The western edge of this street merges with West Street, which spans the western perimeter of the borough. Connecting Manhattan with New Jersey, the Holland Tunnel has exits ramps that lead directly to Canal Street. This important street merges with the Manhattan Bridge in the Lower East Side. The two-level suspension bridge has multiple lanes that accommodate vehicles, subway trains, pedestrians and bicyclists over the East River. Of course, Canal Street is also easily accessible by rapid transit. The 1, 4, A, C and Q lines are some of the New York City trains that stop in underground stations on Canal Street. Therefore, this thoroughfare is directly linked to virtually all major neighbourhoods in Manhattan. You can also take a Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) bus to dozens of stops that are located on or just off this busy street. Part of a bicycle-sharing system, Citi Bike kiosks are easily accessible in the neighbourhoods that are situated along Canal Street.

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Canal Street
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