Madison Avenue

Running in a north-south configuration, Madison Avenue is one of the busiest roads in Manhattan. A part of this avenue is lined with skyscrapers that host corporate offices. Some of NYC's top attractions and parks are also easily accessible from Madison Avenue. The advertising industry has dominated the business atmosphere of the avenue since the 20th century. This historic thoroughfare continues to epitomize the hustle and bustle of the Big Apple.


Madison Avenue
Madison Avenue was incorporated into New York City's rapidly growing street grid in the middle of the 19th century. Named after the fourth president of the United States of America, this avenue has played a key role in Manhattan's bustling economy for generations. The advertising industry dramatically transformed the character of the avenue in the early 20th century. Some of America's top advertising agencies established offices on this busy avenue that was closely intertwined with NYC's thriving economy. Some of America's earliest radio and television advertisements were created by the brilliant marketing experts in this part of NYC. High-end retail also came to Madison Avenue after World War II. In Midtown Manhattan, this road is lined with dozens of stores that sell premium items from the world's top fashion designers and brands. In terms of the retail market, Madison Avenue closely competes with the neighbouring Fifth Avenue.


Some of Manhattan's top landmarks and cultural sites are located on or just off Madison Avenue. Occupying just more than six acres, Madison Square Park defines the southernmost point of this famous road. This historic park includes the Worth Monument and several other statues that honour the legacies of prominent American figures. As one of the earliest skyscrapers built in New York City, the iconic Flatiron Building stands above Madison Square. You don't have to be a genius or scholar to enjoy the exhibits at the nearby National Museum of Mathematics, which has interactive presentations. In Midtown Manhattan, Madison Avenue runs past some other major landmarks, such as the flagship location of the New York Public Library, which is housed in a stunning Beaux-Arts building. The Metlife Building and 383 Madison Avenue are among the many skyscrapers that tower over the avenue in this busy part of the borough. Madison Avenue also runs parallel to the entire eastern flank of Central Park and Museum Mile. As it runs through the Upper East Side, the avenue leads to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum, Frick Collection and other institutions that display fine art. The northernmost part of Madison Avenue cuts right through the heart of Harlem. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and Marcus Garvey Park are located just off the avenue.


Arguably one of the busiest roads in Manhattan, Madison Avenue has a one-way traffic pattern heading uptown. Running for approximately six miles, this road intersects more than 100 streets in multiple neighbourhoods. There are dozens of Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) bus stops along the avenue. Of course, the New York City Subway is also easily accessible on or just a few blocks away from Madison Avenue. Centrally located in Midtown Manhattan, Grand Central Terminal handles commuter and subway trains on dozens of platforms. This historic rail hub is served by the Metro-North Railroad and the subway. Catching a taxi on Madison Avenue shouldn't be difficult, but traffic congestion in Midtown Manhattan could delay your travel plans. The northern tip of the avenue terminates at the Madison Avenue Bridge that goes into the Bronx.

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