Ed Sullivan Theater

Named after the Ed Sullivan Show, the Ed Sullivan Theater is a historic venue in the TTheatre District of Manhattan. This famous venue has also hosted a talk show that was led by David Letterman. Today, the theater is the main home for a late night show with Stephen Colbert.

History

Ed Sullivan Theater
In the late 1920s, Hammerstein's Theater opened in the heart of New York City's famous Theater District. As one of the most distinguished architects of the time, Herbert Krapp was commissioned to design this venue. In fact, this talented planner directly participated in the design of more than a dozen other theaters on Broadway. The Great Depression took a heavy toll on Hammerstein's Theater, which closed because of severe financial problems. Later in the 1930s, a nightclub opened in place of the theater to accommodate a new type of demand for social life. Perhaps the most important chapter of the venue began after World War II as the charismatic Ed Sullivan moved in for a new talk show. After making its debut in 1948, the Ed Sullivan Show successfully ran in the theater for more than two decades. Some of America's and the world's top musicians and celebrities enthusiastically visited the Ed Sullivan Theater. The Beatles, Elvis Presley and the Rolling Stones were among the many popular musicians who performed on this mainstream television show. The Ed Sullivan Show officially ended in 1971, and the theater served multiple purposes for the following decades. For example, some game shows were recorded inside the former space that had entertained a live audience for decades. In the early 1990s, the Late Show with David Letterman relocated to this well-established studio that was renovated and converted for modern use. The final episode of the show aired in 2015, and Stephen Colbert was called in as the successor. Since then, the Late Show with Stephen Colbert has been the main tenant of the Ed Sullivan Theater.

Features and Highlights

The Ed Sullivan Theater retains many original features that were installed in the 1920s and 1930s. Stained glass windows have been restored to add vintage appeal to the historic venue. Domed chambers and vaults create a unique open space that's unlike most contemporary studios that host talk shows. Throughout the decades, the seating layout has been significantly modified based on the vision of the owners. More than 370 spacious seats are installed in this intimate theater that has hosted celebrities for generations.

Visiting Ed Sullivan Theater

The Ed Sullivan Theater is situated along the iconic Broadway in the heart of Midtown Manhattan. Getting to this exciting part of the Big Apple by train should be easy. Located just one block away from the theater, the 7th Avenue station is served by the B, D and E lines of the New York City Subway. You can also take the 1 and 2 trains to the 50th Street station at the corner of Broadway. Served by the N, Q, R and W routes, the 57th Street station is also conveniently located within walking distance of the venue. If you plan on driving to this busy part of Manhattan, keep in mind that 7th Avenue, Broadway and 8th Avenue follow one-way traffic patterns. There are more than a dozen indoor parking garages within a few blocks of the Ed Sullivan Theater. Taxis might not be able to legally stop right near the theater's entrance, so prepare to get off in spots that are just a few steps away. Dozens of Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) buses also provide express service to the Theater District.

Location: 1697 Broadway, New York City, NY, 10019

Click here to visit Ed Sullivan Theater official website

Note: This information can change without notice. Confirm all details directly with the company in question.

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