New York Transit Museum

As the name strongly suggests, the New York Transit Museum tells the rich history of public transportation in New York City. Housed in a historic underground station, this unique museum has a large collection of vintage train and subway fleets. There are also plenty of multimedia presentations that highlight the evolution of transit in the Big Apple.

History

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In 1936, the Court Street station opened to serve the rapidly growing population of Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. Despite great expectations, this station was only in service for approximately a decade. After closing in the late 1940s, this underground transit hub served as an authentic scene for several popular American movies. In 1976, the New York Transit Museum was opened as part of a revival of the historic station and the surrounding neighbourhood. The New York Transit Exhibit was the first presentation that paved the way for plenty of other great exhibitions. Throughout the years, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has significantly enhanced and expanded the museum's collections. After all, this organisation is in charge of operating one of the most extensive public transportation networks in the world. The MTA has been more than happy to set up decommissioned trains and buses that once served the people of NYC.

Collection

The New York Transit Museum boasts a vast selection of authentic rail locomotives and buses that have navigated New York City. Trams and streetcars dating back to the early 20th century are among the museum's most precious possessions. There are also plenty of authentic subway cars and locomotives on display. Additionally, vintage commuter and intercity trains line the museum's underground space. Nearly all of the trains have authentic interiors that reflect specific time periods. Visitors will surely get a sense of nostalgia upon walking inside the well-preserved vehicles that still maintain their original character. Some of the subway and train cars even have decades-old advertisements of consumer products, entertainment and other interesting topics. Some of the permanent exhibits include On the Streets: New York’s Trolleys and Buses, Moving the Millions and Steel, Stone & Backbone: Building New York’s Subways. Classic fare tokens, turnstiles and many other genuine installations can be found in the galleries.

Other Hints and Tips

Located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, Grand Central Terminal hosts exhibits that are sponsored by the New York Transit Museum. As one of the busiest transportation hubs in New York City, this iconic landmark is the ideal place to show off the city's rich heritage relating to public transit. The rotating exhibits can be seen at the Main Concourse, which is a central point that provides convenient access to numerous train gates and platforms. Additionally, the museum has its own shop in the Bowling Green area of Lower Manhattan. Of course, you can also buy plenty of cool souvenirs at the museum's main location in Brooklyn.

Visiting New York Transit Museum

The New York Transit Museum is located at the boundary of Brooklyn Heights and Boerum Hill, which are some of the most vibrant neighbourhoods in the borough of Brooklyn. More than 10 Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) bus lines stop along the busy streets of these historic districts. There are also more than five NYC subway stations that are within just a few blocks of the museum. Located near the grounds of the Brooklyn Borough Hall, the Borough Hall station is served by the 2,3,4 and 5 lines. The Jay Street-MetroTech station gets service from the A,C and F lines. All of these routes provide convenient express connections between Brooklyn and Manhattan. If you plan on driving to the museum, you should be able to find some parking space along the streets that branch off Boerum Place.

Location: Corner of Boerum Place and Schermerhorn Street, Downtown Brooklyn, NY

Click here to visit New York Transit Museum official website

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