Penn Station

Having a central location in Manhattan, Penn Station is by far the busiest transportation hub in New York City. Served by dozens of rail lines, this underground complex sits below Madison Square, which is the home of NYC's top professional sports teams. Penn Station is a bustling venue where excited visitors and local commuters bump shoulders on a daily basis.

History

Penn Station
The original Pennsylvania Station opened in 1910 in the heart of Midtown Manhattan. As one of the most prominent architectural firms in NYC, McKim, Mead & White was chosen for the ambitious project. After nearly a decade of construction, the newly built train station simultaneously became one of the city's grandest landmarks. Enormous columns and colonnades defined the stunning Beaux-Arts facade of the rail complex. Classical Greek and Roman columns also lined the spacious waiting room that had tall ceilings with vaults. In the 1960's, Pennsylvania Station was demolished despite some heavy opposition. The plan called for a redevelopment of a mixed-use property that would include a sports venue, retail and office space. The current Penn Station officially opened in 1968 in sync with the opening of the new Madison Square Garden. Throughout the decades, both of these famous venues have undergone some major renovations and expansions to serve a growing population of residents and tourists from all over the world.

Rail Service

The Upper Level at Penn Station is home to the Main Concourse, which serves as an entry point to all Amtrak platforms. Amtrak primarily offers intercity service to major metropolitan areas all over the United States. The New Jersey Transit concourse also occupies a significant portion of the Upper Level. NJ Transit trains mostly provide commuter service between Manhattan and the northern parts of the Garden State. Some trains also connect Penn Station directly with downtown Newark and Newark Liberty International Airport, which is one of the three major airports in the NYC metropolitan area. The Lower Level at Penn Station has platforms that are used by the Long Island Railroad (LIRR) system. This extensive network links Manhattan with dozens of suburban communities in Nassau and Suffolk counties, which are immediately to the east of NYC's borders. A lengthy tunnel-like concourse in the Lower Level also leads to several platforms that are served by the New York City subway. You can catch the A, C, E, 1, 2 and 3 lines at this busy rail hub.

Retail and Dining

As the busiest transit hub in NYC, Penn Station appropriately has more than 50 food options to feed hungry passengers. Most of the cafes, restaurants and other similar establishments are located in the Connecting Concourse that leads to the LIRR tracks. You'll also find some retail and dining options near the Amtrak and NJ Transit areas. Additionally, Madison Square Garden has gift shops that are conveniently accessible via accelerators from Penn Station. These stores sell just about anything that displays pride in the Knicks, Rangers and Liberty teams.

Visiting Penn Station

Penn Station occupies several blocks in the middle of Midtown Manhattan. The eastern flank of the station sits right along 7th Avenue, which leads directly to neighbouring Times Square just a few blocks to the north. The west flank of the building is bordered by 8th Avenue and the historic James A. Farley Post Office Building, one of the largest postal offices in the world. One Penn Plaza and No.2 Penn Plaza are notable skyscrapers that rise hundreds of feet above Penn Station. At street level, the train station merely looks like a foundation for the iconic Madison Square Garden. Most of the levels of Penn Station are actually located underground below the legendary sports arena.

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