The Big Apple

As one of the greatest cities in the world, New York City has several interesting nicknames. Have you ever wondered why this metropolis is known as The Big Apple? The story behind it is surprising. This term was first used in the 1920s by a sports journalist who worked for the New York Morning Telegraph. Since then, the phrase Big Apple has worked its way into mainstream culture on a global scale.

Origin of The Big Apple Nickname for New York City

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The state of New York has traditionally been one of the top growers of apples. However, the production of McIntosh apples has nothing to do with The Big Apple nickname of New York City. The origin of this unique name can be traced back to the Roaring Twenties, a period that has brought tremendous prosperity to the city on many levels. Horse racing was one of the top sports in NYC during this exciting decade. Specializing in sports, the journalist John Joseph Fitz Gerald covered many of the local races throughout the city and the surrounding suburbs. He worked for the New York Morning Telegraph, which had a significant circulation during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Fitz Gerald first coined the term Big Apple in reference to the city's high status in horse racing and other professional sports. He routinely used the nickname in many of his articles and other publications about New York City. By the 1930s and 1940s, The Big Apple had become a common phrase for residents of the city. The nickname was even incorporated into music, dance, theatre and other forms of local entertainment. However, the rest of the United States of America hasn't yet acknowledged or embraced the new label for the nation's largest city. Today, The Big Apple is commonly used in songs, TV shows, films, literature and other media all over the world.

Evolution of the Big Apple Name

During the 1960s and 1970s, New York City suffered economic, social and political problems. Some parts of Manhattan were no longer attractive for tourists. For example, the Theatre District and Times Square were considered quite dangerous during those decades. In an effort to revive tourism, NYC launched a widespread marketing campaign unlike any other. The official entity that was responsible for managing conventions and visits decided to brand the city as The Big Apple. This fun, catchy and exciting nickname was supposed to create widespread buzz and hype among potential tourists. By the early 1970s, The Big Apple had become a universal label for NYC. Visitors and residents alike started buying merchandise with a colourful apple logo that suddenly became a new symbol for the metropolis.

Attractions and Symbols of the Big Apple

Based in the borough of Queens, the New York Mets of the MLB have embraced The Big Apple nickname since 1980. This franchise used the signature Home Run Apple to celebrate home runs at Shea Stadium. When the new Citi Field opened in 2007, the iconic symbol was retired. Disappointed fans pressured the New York Mets to save the original Home Run Apple. Fortunately, this installation was restored and preserved on the grounds of Citi Field. Before entering the stadium's gates, fans often pose in front of this popular symbol of the Mets and NYC. The intersection of West 54th Street and Broadway is officially known as The Big Apple Corner. A native New Yorker, Mayor Rudy Giuliani enthusiastically approved the renaming of the corner in 1997. Situated between Pier 46 and Pier 45 in Manhattan, the Apple sculpture is another notable landmark that celebrates The Big Apple nickname. Standing 9 feet tall, this bronze installation was made by Stephan Weiss, who was married to the world-famous fashion designer Donna Karan. The Apple has recently become one of the most popular attractions in the West Village neighbourhood. This artwork is beautifully incorporated into the lush gardens along the Hudson River.

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The Big Apple Corner
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